Ken Romero

   Ken Romero, an award-winning artist, was born on September 23, 1956, and is a member of the Taos and Laguna Pueblos in New Mexico. His rich heritage serves as an inspiration to his work and is reflected in the unique, one-of-a-kind pendants, rings, bracelets, and bolo ties he creates.

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   Ken is known for his elaborate lapidary work. He cuts directly from the finest stones, coral, and shells, and then shapes each piece to fit the most intricate design. "I design my pieces with inlay to look and feel like a village or pueblo building. I call this my pueblo village design inlay." All of the jewelry is completed with Ken's hallmark.
   Ken is a full time artist, working in the arts 22 years. He has an Assoc. of Fine Arts Degree from the Institute of American Indian Arts and a BA from the California College of Art and Design. He has been awarded Best of Show, Best of Division and two Merit Awards just in 1998. He was also one of the selected Magnifico Artists in '98.

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"Throughout my life, I've always felt a deep need to fulfill a dream. My dream is to create beauty in art, and art as jewelry to be worn for all to see by expressing the colors of Native culture.
   Contemporary Native American jewelry is my life's work. Intricate detailed semi-precious stone inlay, rich in colors and lasting weight, hallmark each piece fashioned into one-of-a-kind elegant work of fine jewelry. My work has been described as being 'Contemporary in Traditional Native Design.' My work has been shown in numerous prestigious Native American art shows with award winning acceptance.
   With this acceptance, from present to future, I want to stay on the cutting edge of contemporary Native American jewelry design without sacrificing cultural identity, quality, or workmanship."

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"Pueblo Village Design Inlay"

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   "This is a concept in inlay that I came up with in the past four years. It is going deeper and further to intricately and intensely design my inlay with small and numerous stones inlayed to look and feel like a pueblo village. I start by cutting rough rock, then shaping each individual tiny piece. They are inlayed one by one into a channel to create this concept in creating P.V.D.I. Some bracelets are inlayed with up to 600 stones."

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